NEUROGENETICS

Silvia Paracchini Research Group

Silvia Paracchini
Royal Society University Research Fellow

We are studying the genetic basis of complex cognitive and behavioural phenotypes. In particular we focus on the biology of dyslexia, a specific impairment in learning to read which is caused in large part by genetic factors. We are also interested in cognitive traits related to dyslexia such as general reading and language abilities.

More recently we have become interested in handedness and in a complex link between dyslexia and laterality. We are using large scale screening involving genome-wide and functional genomics approaches to identify candidate genes or loci underlying these phenotypes. In parallel we are developing functional assays to understand the biological mechanisms that mediate genetic differences to phenotypic variation.

 

Recent news

ASHG 2019

Filippo attended  the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) annual conference in Houston. Filippo presented his latest results with a poster entitled: ‘GWAS for handedness indexes: support a role of microtubule in brain asymmetries and neurodevelopmental...

New preprint

Our latest preprint is out on PsyArXiv. It reports the analysis of handedness data collected in Hong Kong. A great collaboration with colleagues at the Chinese Hong Kong University and University of Hong Kong.

Two new preprints!!!

This week we are very excited to share two preprints perfectly showcasing the multidisciplinary approach of our group. In the first study, Rebeca has developed a cellular KO system to understand the function of the dyslexia susceptibility KIAA0319 gene. In...

Welcome Michelle!

We welcome Michelle Moore, joining the group this week. Michelle starts a PhD project funded by the Graduate School for Interdisciplinary Studies. The project is a new collaboration between the School of Medicine (Silvia) and the School of Economics (Dr Margaret...

New Paper

We are very happy to share the results of a project conducted in collaboration with the University of Bologna, published in The FASEB Journal. With this work we identified a rare mutation in the SPART gene and leading to a form of developmental delay. Functional...

Contact us

School of Medicine
University of St Andrews
North Haugh
St Andrews, Fife
KY16 9TF
UK

Tel: 01334 463542
email: sp58@st-andrews.ac.uk

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